Awbury Arboretum

Awbury’s 56 acres of open meadow, forested greenspace, urban farm, and manicured gardens offer the perfect green escape from the bustling streets of Philadelphia.....

Awbury’s 56 acres of open meadow, forested greenspace, urban farm, and manicured gardens offer the perfect green escape from the bustling streets of Philadelphia.

Overview

Awbury Arboretum’s 56 acres of open meadow, forested greenspace, manicured gardens, and urban farm are a spacious, green, escape from the streets of the city. Originally a summer estate for the Cope-Haines family, the arboretum still boasts original architecture built by the family on site. Stop by the historic Francis Cope House to obtain a map of the grounds, and walk the gardens, meadows, and natural playgrounds.

History

Purchased in 1852 by Henry Cope, a Quaker shipping merchant, Awbury was the summer estate for the Cope-Haines family. The Francis Cope House was built in 1860, and a number of Victorian and Colonial Revival houses were constructed in the following years. Celebrated horticulturalist William Saunders designed Awbury’s grounds in the nineteenth century in the English landscape garden tradition. Saunders also designed the National Cemetery at the Gettysburg Battlefield and the Capitol grounds in Washington, DC. The Cope family established the Arboretum in 1916 for the preservation of the grounds and for the public use of the estate as a “quiet enjoyment of nature.”

Greenspaces

Awbury Arboretum boasts 56 acres of pastoral landscape for visitors to enjoy. Stop by the Francis Cope House upon arrival to see the well-kept gardens and obtain a map of the Arboretum. Walk the grounds and meadows and learn about the large and diverse trees on the property, or have a picnic next to the pond. The AdventureWoods is perfect for an outdoor event and includes a large forest area and natural playground for children to explore. Across East Washington Lane is the Awbury Agricultural Village, home to the Philly Goat Project and the farms of numerous green organizations and businesses in Philadelphia. Get involved at The Farm by maintaining a plot in Awbury’s Community Garden. Awbury Arboretum is open everyday from dawn to dusk for the public to enjoy the greenspace. There is a pedestrian entrance to Awbury directly across from Washington Lane Station on SEPTA’s Chestnut Hill East Line. The 16, 26, and XH bus routes also pass by the Arboretum.

Outdoor Programs

Sunday Fun Days (Sundays 1pm – 4pm, May 1 – October 30)

Meet the Awbury team at The Farm at Awbury for workshops, wellness classes, and family-friendly activities. Explore the community gardens, orchards, and goat pen on site.

Wellness at Awbury (check dates and times online)

Attend a yoga class, meditation session, or group walk around the arboretum and farm. Destress with Awbury’s events coordinator among the trees, birds, and animals.

Wild Wisdom (register online)

Awbury developed this nine-month program in partnership with the Wild Foodies of Philly to introduce participants to the edible, medicinal, and craft plants of the Philadelphia region.

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Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Gardens
  • Birdwatching
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Apiary
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Outdoor wifi
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom

Black Writers Museum

Overview

The Black Writers Museum is located in the heart of Germantown’s Vernon Park in the Vernon House, which faces ACES Museum across Germantown Avenue. Vernon Park has plenty of greenspace for lounging and playing, with a baseball field, playground, and seating areas scattered throughout. Schedule a tour for ACES (Monday through Thursday by appointment) or the Black Writers Museum (Thursday and Fridays: 11 am-3pm, Saturday: 12pm-4pm), and enjoy Vernon Park afterward.

Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Playground

Cliveden

This summer estate turned parkland offers scenic views of the Chew house and grounds and a quiet escape from the city right off Germantown Avenue.

This summer estate turned parkland offers scenic views of the Chew house and grounds and a quiet escape from the city right off Germantown Avenue.

Overview

Cliveden’s beautiful 5.2 acre estate sits atop a peaceful landscape right off of Germantown Avenue, with scenic views of the Chew House and grounds. Visitors are free to walk the grounds whenever the gates are open on weekdays, where they can enjoy ample parkland for lounging picnics , and exercise. Tours are available Thursday through Sunday from 12pm to 4pm, from May to November.

History

Cliveden, the home of the Chew family for seven generations, was built in 1767. Documents and artifacts found on the property offer important insight into topics such as the Battle of Germantown and the experiences of enslaved and indentured people in early America. During the nineteenth century, lots of agricultural work occurred at Cliveden, and multiple members of the Chew family were engaged in agricultural science. Cliveden was transformed into parkland in 1972.

Greenspaces

Today, Cliveden offers 5.5 acres of parkland with ample greenspace for lounging, picnics, and exercise. Bring students for the History Hunters program, or come with your family for a stroll around the grounds. Doggy bags are available at the entrance as well. Visitors are free to walk the grounds during the weekdays from 9am to 5pm. Tours of the home are offered Thursday through Sunday at the start of the hour from 12pm to 4pm. The 23 bus route passes the site, and street parking is available. Enter through the gate on Cambria Street.

Outdoor Programs

Baby Wordplay(Mondays 10am -11am)

Bring your children for a class filled with stories and play, and enjoy the grounds and greenspace afterwards. Registration is required.

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Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Dog walking
  • Sitting areas
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Rental Events

Concord School House and Upper Burying Ground

Overview

The Upper Burial Ground is the resting palace of many prominent Germantown residents, and tours are available to be scheduled. Theater reenactments and events occur on the Concord Grounds on major holidays like Juneteenth, July 4th, and Memorial Day.

History

The Upper Burying Ground was founded along with Hood Cemetery in November 1683, shortly after the settlement of Germantown by Dutch-speaking colonists. The oldest known burial is that of Cornelius Tyson, one of the first Germantown settlers, who died in 1716. Concord School House was constructed years later in 1775 by Jacob Knor, the builder of Germantown Academy. Concord was established as an English-only school, reflecting the integration of the Dutch-speaking colonists into English America. Records indicate that the school was integrated to some degree, as Black boys were allowed to attend the school, and a few anti-slavery meetings took place in the School House as well.

Greenspaces

The burial ground adjacent to Concord is the resting place of many prominent Germantown residents. Explore the original and reconstructed gravestones, including that of Cornelius Tyson, the first person buried in the Upper Burying Ground. Theater reenactments and events occur on the grounds, especially during major holidays like Juneteenth, July Fourth, and Memorial Day. Concord is open on the second Saturday of each month from 12pm to 4pm. Visitors can also schedule a tour of the grounds. The greenspace gate is not open to visitors outside of Second Saturdays. Concord is accessible via the 23, X, and XH bus routes. Street parking is also available

Outdoor Programs

Juneteenth

Enjoy a historical reenactment by the Grounded Theater Company at Concord during the annual Juneteenth Festival along Germantown Avenue.

July 4 Bell Ringing Ceremony

Visit Concord for the schoolhouse bell ringing and a series of dramatic readings to commemorate the nation’s birthday.

Back to School at the Old Schoolhouse (August)

Donate school supplies for neighborhood students during Concord’s annual Back to School event.

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Amenities

  • Gardens
  • Birdwatching
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Cemetery
  • Educational + recreational space for schools

Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion

Travel back in time to the 1800s at Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, Philadelphia’s only authentically-restored Victorian house and garden.....

Travel back in time to the 1800s at Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, Philadelphia’s only authentically-restored Victorian house and garden.

Overview

Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion is Philadelphia’s only authentically-restored Victorian house and garden, open on Fridays and Saturdays from 12 to 3 pm. This quarter-acre garden around the mansion boasts restored Victorian gardens that include flowerbeds, a grapevine trellis, and a small pond.

History

Ebenezer Maxwell, a wealthy cloth merchant, and Anna Smith Maxwell built the house in 1859 and were its first occupants. The Hunter Stevenson family was the house’s second occupants, and it remained under their ownership until 1956. Today, Ebeenzer serves as a museum which showcases the household and livelihood of a wealthy family during the Victorian era.

Greenspaces

The quarter acre garden around the mansion reflects the horticultural practices and traditions during the Victorian era. The front of the property along Tulpehocken Street lends itself to the workings of Andrew Jackson Downing, a prominent landscape architect in the 1800s, and the rear of the property lends itself to Frank Scott, a contemporary of Downing. The garden includes color-coded flower beds, a grapevine trellis, and a small pond. Enjoy the garden after a tour of the mansion for the complete Victorian experience. The mansion is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 12pm to 3pm. Call in advance to schedule a tour, no more than six people. Street parking is available.

Outdoor Programs

Workshops (check online calendar)

Attend a nature journaling class and connect with Ebenezer’s garden, or attend one of the many Halloween events in the old mansion. Keep up to date with Ebenezer’s workshop calendar to truly experience the grounds and mansion.

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Amenities

  • Gardens
  • Birdwatching
  • Photography
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Public restroom

Germantown Mennonite Meetinghouse

Experience the neighborhood’s German roots at the Mennonite Meetinghouse and enjoy a live performance at Pastorius Community Garden right next door......

Experience the neighborhood’s German roots at the Mennonite Meetinghouse and enjoy a live performance at Pastorius Community Garden right next door.

Overview

The gates are always open at the Germantown Mennonite Meetinghouse, so the cemetery and green space may be enjoyed at all times. Either obtain a Cemetery Guide to traverse the grounds, or call ahead to schedule a tour of the meetinghouse. Just behind the Meetinghouse is Pastorius Garden, a community garden with public green space and raised garden beds.

History

In 1683, thirteen Dutch-speaking Mennonite and Quaker families settled in the area we now know as Germantown, becoming the first Europeans to colonize this area. In 1688, the Mennonite congregation organized the Protest Against Slavery, the first anti-slavery protest in the United States. The historic Mennonite Meetinghouse and burial ground was constructed in 1770 at the site of the 1688 protest, and still remains today as a congregation space for Mennonite families.

Greenspaces

Obtain a Cemetery Guide from the Meetinghouse and traverse the grounds. The gates are always open, so the greenspace and burial grounds can be enjoyed at any time. Visit on your own time to relax amongst the gravestones. Behind the Meetinghouse is Pastorius Garden, a community garden with the mission to increase nutritious and affordable food in the Germantown neighborhood. Pastorius features numerous raised beds and a public greenspace for art and culture celebrations. There are three community garden beds where anyone can harvest the food for free. For a tour of the Meetinghouse, call ahead to make an appointment. No reservations are required to access the burial ground and Pastorius Community Garden out back. The site sits along the 23 bus route and is walking distance from the X and XH bus routes. Street parking is also available.

Outdoor Programs

Pastorius Community Garden Live Music Series (check website for scheduled events)

Enjoy outdoor performances amidst the raised beds and orchard of Pastorius Community Garden. Discover local artists and explore the diverse musical backgrounds of the Germantown neighborhood. The events are free and open to the public.

Christmas Carol at the Meetinghouse (first Saturday in December)

Join other carolers for some Holiday fun. Sing your favorite winter holiday songs to the neighbors and passersby of Germantown Mennonite Meetinghouse.

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Amenities

  • Gardens
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Cemetery
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom

Grumblethorpe

Grumblethorpe has everything gardeners dream of: a beautifully maintained garden, urban farm, greenhouse, orchard, and chicken coop.....

Grumblethorpe has everything gardeners dream of: a beautifully maintained garden, urban farm, greenhouse, orchard, and chicken coop. Visit Grumblethorpe for inspiration for your own garden at home!

Overview

Grumblethorpe boasts a historic house, garden, urban farm, chicken coop, apiary, small orchard, and greenhouse. Visitors are sure to enjoy the beautifully maintained garden and locally grown produce at a weekly Farmstand: each Saturday during the Summer. The grounds are open for tours on the second Sunday of each month from 12pm to 4pm.

History

Built in 1744, Grumblethorpe is the ancestral home of the Wister family and has always been a site of great horticultural activity in Germantown. The Wister family was active in the neighborhood for many generations, contributing greatly to the pastoral landscapes of old Germantown and the world of agricultural science in early America.

Greenspaces

The two-acre grounds boast a historic house, garden, urban farm, chicken coop, apiary, small orchard, and greenhouse. The garden reflects the planting styles of the past residents of Grumblethorpe and showcases a variety of beautiful flowers and plants. The farm provides important insight on food production in our urban environment, and the produce grown by staff and the Grumblethorpe Youth Volunteers is sold at the weekly Farmstand. Enjoy the greenspace during the Farmstand each Saturday from 9:30am to 1:30pm during the summer months. The historic house and grounds are also open for tours on the second Saturday of every month from 12pm to 4pm. Street parking is available, and Grumblethorpe is situated along the 23 bus route.

Outdoor Programs

Farmstand (Saturdays 9:30am – 1:30pm, June – August)

Buy fresh and local produce from Grumblethorpe’s urban farm at the weekly Farmstand! SNAP benefits are accepted as well.

Grumblethorpe Youth Volunteers

Become a part of the Grumblethorpe family by joining the Grumblethorpe Youth Volunteers. GYVs is a service youth group (ages 12-18) which teaches students about gardening and civic work. During the school year, volunteers meet monthly and help with events for Grumblethorpe and Historic Germantown. During the summer, GYVs grow fruits and vegetables and work at the Farmstand on Saturdays as a paid intern.

Address: 5267 Germantown Avenue

Phone: 215-843-4820

Email: grumblethorpe@philalandmarks.org

Website: www.philalandmarks.org/grumblethorpe

Instagram: @grumblethorpehistoric

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Amenities

  • Gardens
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Apiary
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Public restroom

Historic Fair Hill

Historic Fair Hill is an urban oasis situated at the heart of North Philadelphia’s Fairhill neighborhood, with plenty of family-friendly activities and programming to enjoy.......

Historic Fair Hill is an urban oasis situated at the heart of North Philadelphia’s Fairhill neighborhood, with plenty of family-friendly activities and programming to enjoy.

Overview

Historic Fairhill is a 4.6 acre park, cemetery, community garden, and urban oasis in the heart of North Philadelhpias’s Fairhill neighborhood. Grounds are open during daylight hours from April to November for visitors interested in a rich community orchard and free activities, or the resting place of many Philadelphian abolitionists and women’s rights activists.

History

Established in 1703, the site is the resting place of many Philadelphia abolitionists and women’s rights activists. Lucretia Mott was a Quaker abolitionist and the founder of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society. Robert Purvis dedicated his life to political issues concerning Black Americans, earning him the title of President of the Underground Railroad. The graves of the activists are maintained and open to visitors to pay their respects.

Greenspaces

The burial ground’s 4.6 acres are used as a neighborhood park, local gathering spot, and community garden. The grounds contain an orchard with peaches, plums, juneberries, and figs, a digging pit, a bonfire, and a tire swing. Fair Hill also has three active satellite gardens. Grounds are open to visitors during daylight hours from April to November. Typically open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10am to 2pm and Saturdays from 10am to 3pm. Call before arriving to make sure the gates are unlocked. Enter through the pedestrian gates on Cambria Street or from the cobblestone drive on Indiana Street. Street parking is available around the burial ground. Also accessible via the 23 bus route and the Broad Street Line’s North Philadelphia Station.

Outdoor Programs

Family Fun Saturdays(Saturdays 12pm – 3pm, April – June)

Enjoy Fair Hill’s greenspace with other families and children! Staff is on site to show families around the garden and orchard. Pick peaches, figs, juneberries, and cherries when they are ready to harvest from the Philadelphia Orchard Project’s on-site orchard. Play materials such as frisbees, chalk, badminton, scavenger hunts, bubbles, tire swing, and a sprinkler are also available.

Gardening Days(Saturdays 10am – 3pm, April – October)

Volunteer with Historic Fair Hill’s garden team at any of the satellite gardens (Auburn Street, Potter-Thomas School, and Semilla Children’s Garden). Meet head gardener Tito and learn how to cultivate fruits and vegetables in Philadelphia’s urban environment. Harvests are given out for free to the surrounding neighborhood during the weekly Farm Stand at St. John Memorial Church.

Summer Youth Internship

The gardening internship program, open to sixth through twelfth grade students, begins in June and runs for six weeks. Participants meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10am – 1pm and learn about organic farming, nutrition, and community building. Lunch and a stipend of $200 are provided.

Nature Field Trip

Fairhill school children learn about the tree species on site and observe the bugs, birds, and other animals which live on the grounds. Children can get an Explorer Backpack with a magnifying glass, scavenger hunts, crayons, and plant ID cards at Family Fun Saturdays. Contact Historic Fair Hill ahead of time to schedule a field trip.

Address: 2901 Germantown Avenue

Phone: 215-844-1683 ext. 107

Email: info@historicfairhill.com

Website: https://historicfairhill.com/

Instagram: @historic_fh

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Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Gardens
  • Birdwatching
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Cemetery
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Public restroom

Historic Rittenhousetown

Historic Rittenhousetown connects the developed Germantown section of Philadelphia with the beautiful Wissahickon watershed.......

Historic Rittenhousetown connects the developed Germantown section of Philadelphia with the beautiful Wissahickon watershed. Dip your feet in Paper Mill Run after a hike through Forbidden Drive!

Overview

Historic Rittenhousetown is the site of the first paper mill in America. Once a thriving 18th century industrial village, the site operates today as a 20-acre Philadelphia Parks and Recreation site nestled in the Wissahickon with the Paper Mill Run or Monoshone Creek running through the heart of the village. The grounds have recently been designated a Level 1 Arboretum and feature, open and picnic space, a collection of cherry trees, a Magnolia Grove, and over 28 identified native tree species.

History

Historic Rittenhousetown is the site of the first paper mill in the Americas and was a hub of early industrial activity in the Germantown area. Constructed in 1690 by William Rittenhouse, the Homestead is the birthplace of David Rittenhouse, an influential scientist and public figure in colonial America. William Rittenhouse was also the first Mennonite minister in the Americas.

Greenspaces

The grounds represent twenty acres along Paper Mill Run and serves as the trailhead for multiple trails in the Wissahickon Park system. Stop by the cafe and bike shop before making your way to Forbidden Drive, or relax at one of the benches along Paper Mill Run. The site has ample room for leisurely activities and exercise routines. Learn about the history of the site and how early residents of Germantown lived alongside the natural world. The grounds are open from dawn to dusk, seven days a week. Tours of the Homestead and Bake House are offered on Saturdays from 11am to 2pm during the summer months. The cafe and bike shop is open Thursday through Sunday from 8:30am to 12:30pm. There is street parking along Lincoln Drive, and the site is accessible via the 53 and 65 bus routes.

Outdoor Programs

Paper Making Workshops

Check the events calendar for the Spring, Summer, and Fall series of paper making workshops. Explore the history of flax in Germantown and tap into the region’s tradition of paper manufacturing. All paper is made from recycled materials.

Rittenhousetown Fair

Visit the greenspace during the annual Rittenhousetown Fair. Kid-friendly activities, events, and vendors are available, and yoga and hikes are offered throughout the day.

Fermentation Farmers Market (Sundays 12pm – 4pm, July – September)

Browse the myriad of fermented products offered by vendors at HRT’s unique Fermentation Farmers Market. Experience a farmers market like no other in the Philadelphia aree during the summer months.

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Johnson House

Immerse yourself in America’s past by visiting one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours in Philadelphia......

Immerse yourself in America’s past by visiting one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours in Philadelphia.

Overview

The Johnson House, one of the only stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours in Philadelphia, is bordered by open greenspace and a luscious garden maintained by staff. The greenspace gate is open Monndays and Fridays from 11 am to 2 pm, and is perfect for events and activities, or simply a moment of relaxation.

History

John Johnson, the son of a Dutch immigrant, built the house in 1768 as a wedding gift for his son John Johnson, Jr. In the 1800s, Samuel Johnson and his wife lived on the property and offered their home as a station on the Underground Railroad. William Still, the Father of the Underground Railroad and secretary of the Philadelphia Antislavery Society, participated in “meetings” at the Johnson House, and it is reported that Harriet Tubman also visited the property. The Johnson family lived in the house until 1913, and in 1917 the Woman’s Club of Germantown purchased the property and used it as their headquarters. Today, the Johnson House is one of Philadelphia’s few remaining stops on the Underground Railroad open for tours.

Greenspaces

The Johnson House has an open greenspace bordering Germantown Avenue and West Washington Lane. The garden is maintained by the staff and includes hostas, box bushes, lilies, and five trees, as well as a small vegetable garden which features some of the crops that were grown by the house’s past residents. One of the larger bushes even has a hangout area for children inside its foliage. The space is perfect for outdoor events and activities, or simply for relaxation. The greenspace gate is open on Mondays and Fridays from 11am to 2pm. Tours of the house should be scheduled ahead of time and are offered on Fridays and Saturdays from 12pm to 3pm. Johnson House is accessible via the 23, X, and XH bus routes. Street parking is also available.

Outdoor Programs

Yoga on the Lawn (check calendar for dates and times)

Take a yoga class with Sankofa Healing Studio on the Johnson House’s lawn.

Juneteenth

Join Johnson House for their annual Juneteenth celebration, complete with vendors and food trucks along Germantown Avenue and tours of the Underground Railroad station.

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Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Gardens
  • Photography
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Outdoor wifi
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom
  • Water

Lest We Forget Slavery Museum

The Germantown Historical Society’s collection includes more than 50,000 documents, artifacts, and photographs related to Germantown’s history......

The Germantown Historical Society’s collection includes more than 50,000 documents, artifacts, and photographs related to Germantown’s history. Experience an individual tour of the private Ragsdale collection of slavery artifacts at the Lest We Forget Slavery Museum.

Overview

The Germantown Historical Society and the Lest We Forget Slavery Museum are directly behind Market Square, a public park in the middle of Germantown. After visiting the Lest We Forget Slavery Museum (tours by appointment) and the Germantown Historical Society (open to visitors 9am-1 pm Tuesdays, 1pm-5pm Thursdays), visitors should return on Saturday to explore the local farmers market at Market Square.

History

The Germantown Historical Society is an educational and research institution, and was founded in 1900 as the Site and Relic Society. The collection includes a vast array of material from 1683 to the present day. Visitors can access the library and archive for local and family research.

Lest We Forget Slavery Museum was founded in 2002 by Gwen and J. Justin Ragsdale. J. Justin Ragsdale has been collecting the artifacts showcased at LWF over the past fifty years. The Museum moved to the Historical Society building in 2017 after being displaced from the Port Richmond neighborhood.

Greenspaces

The Historical Society and Lest We Forget Slavery Museum sit directly behind Market Square, a public park and staple in Germantown. Grab a drink from Uncle Bobby’s and lounge in the park’s grassy areas. Take in the sites and historic vibe of the area. In addition to the Society and LWF Museum, the Germantown White House is located across the street from Market Square. The Historical Society is open to visitors on Tuesdays from 9am to 1pm and on Thursdays from 1pm to 5pm. Schedule your visits to the archive ahead of time. Tours of the Lest We Forget Slavery Museum are available by appointment only. Street parking is available around Germantown Avenue, and the 23 bus route passes Market Square.

Outdoor Programs

Germantown Farmers Market (Saturdays 10am – 2pm)

Buy locally grown produce and other artisan products from the vendors at Market Square. Stop by Grumblehthorpe’s Farmstand a few blocks down Germantown Avenue for additional shopping.

Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Gardens
  • Dog walking
  • Photography
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom

Stenton

Stenton offers the perfect mix of educational programming and beautiful greenspaces. Enjoy the meadows and Colonial Revival Garden while visiting......

Stenton offers the perfect mix of educational programming and beautiful greenspaces. Enjoy the meadows and Colonial Revival Garden while visiting one of Philadelphia’s oldest homes.

Overview

Framed by a Colonial Revival Garden, meadow, and screen of native trees and plants, Stenton is home to one of Philadelphia’s most historic greenspaces. Explore Stenton’s garden- the birthplace of the Garden Club of America, and learn about its 18th century landscape through informational signage (grounds are open 1pm-4pm, Tuesday through Saturday). Finish your visit with a stroll or trip to the playground next door in Stenton Park.

History

Stenton was constructed in the 1720s as the summer home of Philadelphia’s Logan family. James Logan, an early Pennsylvania colonist and William Penn’s right-hand-man, conducted botanical research at Stenton in the early eighteenth century, especially on corn. During the American Revolution, the grounds were a working farm of over 500 acres, and in 1913 the Garden Club of America was founded at Stenton.

Greenspaces

Today, the historic site sits adjacent to Stenton Park and features a Colonial Revival Garden originally designed by John Casper Wister. Stroll through the reconstructed garden and learn about its history via the informational signage. Plan a fun day for the family by visiting the playground next door after a tour of the house and grounds. Stenton’s grounds and greenspace are open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 1pm to 4pm. Tours are also available during those times. The grounds are closed during the winter months. Stenton is accessible via the 23 bus, the Broad Street Line from Logan Station, or regional rail from the Wayne Junction Station. There is a parking lot on site as well.

Outdoor Programs

Egg Hunt and Easter Celebration

Bring the kids to Stenton for an Easter Celebration. Traverse the Colonial Revival Garden, piazza, and meadow in search of Easter eggs, and enjoy the celebration with other families.

Juneteenth

Celebrate Juneteenth at Stenton! Dance with performers and musicians, enjoy kid-friendly activities, and tour the house for free. Food and drinks are provided at the celebration.

Halloween/Harvest Fest

Visit Stenton’s grounds during the spookies time of the year! Tour the house for free, enjoy the haunted house in the basement, and show off your Halloween costume.

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Amenities

  • Exercise
  • Gardens
  • Birdwatching
  • Photography
  • Playground
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom

Wyck

Explore the world of horticulture and one of Germantown’s most beautiful gardens at Wyck. Come and smell the roses during the spring, or get involved with Wyck’s Home......

Explore the world of horticulture and one of Germantown’s most beautiful gardens at Wyck. Come and smell the roses during the spring, or get involved with Wyck’s Home Farm and enjoy fresh, locally-grown produce.

Overview

At Wyck visitors can explore one of Germantown’s most beautiful gardens, including the oldest surviving rose garden in its original plan. Wyck’s grounds are open for visitation Tuesday to Saturday (10 am-4pm) and guided tours are offered Thursday-Saturday (noon-4pm). Whether you are looking to relax in a beautiful space or participate in programs and events that help immerse visitors in the world of horticulture, Wyck offers something for everyone.

History

Wyck was the ancestral home of the Quaker Wistar-Haines family for nine generations, from 1690 to 1973, before being converted to a historic site and garden. The property was originally 50 acres and included multiple gardens, a farm, and an orchard. Wyck is the site of the oldest surviving rose garden in its original plan, designed by Jane Bowne Haines in 1821. Wisteria, the gorgeous purple vining plant native to our region, is named after the Wistar family.

Greenspaces

The gardens on site are beautifully maintained, the Home Farm grows fresh produce for neighbors, and fruit trees are distributed throughout the property. Wyck brings the vibe of a homestead into the city and offers multiple events and programs to immerse visitors in the world of horticulture. The grounds are open free to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 4pm. Walk-in tours of the home are available Thursday through Saturday from 12pm to 4pm. Open season runs from April through mid-November. The entrance along Germantown Avenue leads to the Wyck house and is accessible via the 23, X, and XH bus routes. Street parking is available.

Outdoor Programs

Home Farm Club (Tuesdays 4pm – 6pm, Fridays 9am – 11am)

Wyck’s Home Farm covers 0.25 acres and preserves the site’s historic agricultural traditions. Join the Home Farm Club to help with the cultivation and harvesting of fruits and vegetables at Wyck. Helping with the farm is low commitment, and each volunteer leaves with free produce after a couple hours of work. The Home Farm Club is a great way to learn about gardening while connecting with other community members.

Celebration of the Roses (Saturday of Memorial Day weekend)

Visit Wyck’s historic rose garden at the height of its glory! Enjoy the sights and smells of Wyck’s Heritage Roses and celebrate the coming of spring. Several roses in cultivation today were thought lost until they were discovered growing at Wyck, and all specimens of the Elegant Gallica and Lafayette cultivars available in commercial trade descend from Wyck’s collection.

Carillon Recital Series (Mondays 7:30pm – 8:30pm, throughout July)

Sit in Wyck’s yard to enjoy the concerts that are played at the First United Methodist Church just across the street. Chairs are set up in the South Lawn and visitors are welcome to explore the grounds.

Philadelphia Honey Festival (second Saturday in September, 10am – 4pm)

Hosted in partnership with Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild, the Honey Festival celebrates the honey bee with honey tasting, educational presentations, and bee-bearding. Wyck has its own apiary on site, behind the greenhouse and garden.

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Amenities

  • Gardens
  • Photography
  • Sitting areas
  • Apiary
  • Educational + recreational space for schools
  • Rental Events
  • Public restroom